Christmas Decorations – 4

Knock on wood, it seems everything is working this time. Good thing – I was on the verge of inventing some new, very naughty words, trying to get the darn thing to publish before. Not a good way to get in Santa's good graces.

I think this should just about wrap it up. I ABSOLUTELY LOVE CHRISTMAS! Thanks so much for stopping by so I can share my expression of the season with you. We don't get a lot of company, so I'm glad you folks come on in my humble abode and take a peek at things I cherish! That makes it worth all the effort!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here's wishing you all a blessed and merry Christmas! I hope Santa is very good to you, and all those you hold dear.

TTFN,

Teresa

 

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Christmas Decorations – 3

Next batch πŸ™‚

Because there are so many pics I'm not gabbing much, but if you would like to know more about any of my decorations, go back to December of last year in my archives. I included a bit of history about most of the things I put out. My Mom, who is wonderfully talented, made many of my decorations.

Onward!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cross finger these go thru! See you for part 4 in a minute.

Teresa

 

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A Cottage Bedroom

My time management skills are sorely lacking. But I did manage to get my big little son's former bedroom put back together again. Because of that, my turkey collection has to suffer another full year of being boxed up before they can come out and play again. I have so many beautiful and unique turkeys it's a shame to not get them all out, but I put 5 full totes of Halloween stuff out this year, and by the time all of that got put away, then also had the bedroom re-do that had to get done before Thanksgiving, well something had to give!

Anyway, thought I'd share how the bedroom turned out. I am really happy with it. It feels very calm and feminine and old fashioned to me. Let's see what you think about it –

These are the before pics. This room is only 9 feet by 10 and really difficult to photograph.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I just went from the doorway into the room, then clockwise around the room. It was pretty beat up from my teenage fella living there. When he was little, he used to bedroom hop. With no siblings, he had 3 bedrooms to choose from, but spent his teenage years in this room.

This is the first time I can remember that I didn't make it harder on myself and complicate things by using multiple colors, wallpapering, trying strange paint techniques, etc. I just got two partially full cans of light colored paint out from under the stairs where we store lots of extra paint, and I mixed them together. The result was a nice off white, with casts of buttery creme, beige, and even a bit of a pinkish tint at times. Depending on the light throughout the day, it can take on any of the above tones. I did walls, ceiling, doors, and trim the same color. That made it pretty snappy to finish. We did prime the brown wall with 2 coats of Kilz before paint went on.

This room didn't cost me a dime to re-do. I just shopped my house and didn't have to go out to buy anything. I don't know if that's good or bad, to think you have enough stuff to completely re-do a room and not have to buy a thing, from paint to bedding! The crazy thing is, even if I did add up the initial cost, it would still be little to nothing. I buy paint inexpensively from WalMart and keep what's leftover to use later. Nearly everything in the room is rummage sale or hand-me-down. Let me show you…

The old metal bed, mattress, quilt, little juniper filled chickadee pillow, and old quilt bunny; all from rummage sales. Shelf came from a craft sale, unfinished, and I painted it. The old, old baby dresses hanging from the shelf pegs my Grandma found in a box in the garbage a few houses down from hers. A family moved their elderly relative out of her house and threw nearly everything in the poor lady's house away. So at least these sweet little dresses were rescued. Lamp and chair were my Great Grandmother's. My Mom and I re-upholstered the chair (with clearance fabric) about 10 years ago. Night stand found on Craig's List. Had the lace panels for years. The valance looking thing at the top of the lace is a linen table topper, hand embroidered by my Grandma's tiny little French/Norwegian aunt (she was about 4 feet 10 inches tall in shoes!), many, many years ago. In the frame above the bed is Bruce's Great Grandparent's marriage certificate. It is unusually large, and so beautiful!

I love the detail; the deer by the lake, the different flowers.

Just a few of my favorite poochies from my antique dogs collection. The majority of these were found at rummage sales or were gifts from folks.

 

 

All the antique lady pictures were also my Great Grandmother's.

I moved the gothic window from the living room and added some rope lights. I placed it on an oak 2 drawer chest I got for a song at an antique sale.The wooden shoe lamp was sent from Holland when my Mom's cousin lived overseas. She sent it to my Great Grandmother, and I remember it in her home from the time I was little.

A happy little couple. My little glass corgis were just the right size to be their companions πŸ™‚ .

I put some dollhouse furniture my Mom had when she was little on my little mini hutch.

 

 

 

I'm glad to have it all put together and off the to-do list!

So, in parting, I want to wish everyone the happiest Thanksgiving. I'm going to throw in a couple pics of turkeys from last year, just cuz I'm missing them so much!

 

 

 

TTFN,

Teresa πŸ™‚

 

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HAPPY FALL!

So, I was being very lazy, and thought how I might just skip the Halloween decor this year. Then I remembered I had skipped it last year because we were tearing out carpet in the living room and replacing it with oak floors, and having the existing oak floors in the dining room and hallway refinished. Then I painted: the living room (3 different colors), hallway, dining room ceiling, all the trim in the whole front of the house, the front door inside and out, the screen door, and all the porch railings. I wallpapered the entryway, finally squared off and finished the opening where the gothic window was supposed to go once upon a time, and we added the birch bark backer to the Tulikivi hearth. Truth be told, I was too dang tired to put any Halloween decorations up!

This year, I had none of that for an excuse. I finally decided to get off my dead rear and get in gear. What good is it to have all this stuff if you don't put it out, right?

I started on the front porch and worked my way in.

 

 

I think this is a bicycle basket. I found it at a rummage sale. My thought was to strap it to the gate after filling it with fake flowers (because they won't be hurt if snow sit on them). It works pretty well!

 

These 2 little green pumpkins were the extent of my pumpkin crop from my raised bed veg gardens this year – WooHoo.

 

You flip a switch on this guy, open the top of his skull, and his eyes (sockets) light up, and it looks like flames come out of his skull. Too cool! (I'm easily entertained)

This little gaggle of witches were some of the first Halloween decorations I bought when I got my own place many moons ago.

My bat picture was an illustration in a super old (early 1900's), tattered kids book I found at a rummage sale. It didn't even have a binding on it anymore, just loose pages held between the covers. So I took some of the cuter animal pictures out, brought them to the copy shop, and had them enlarge and print them on heavy card stock for me. I framed the other animals, but decopaged the bats onto an old metal tray from the thrift I cleaned up and spray painted black, and use it for Halloween. I like bats.

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My Mom made the cute jack-o-lantern pillow for me.

I made the crow plate from an image download from Country Living magazine's web site. I printed it onto old dictionary pages, then decopaged them onto a wooden blank plate that I had painted black. It was a pretty inexpensive project and I like it a lot.

This book came from the free bin at the thrift! I haven't read it yet, but knew it would be perfect to set out for Halloween along with the magic wand my big little son made for me in shop class a few years ago. (I was thrilled when he gave it to me, but now that I think about it, do you 'spose he was trying to tell me something? πŸ™‚ )

 

 

I got these little paper mΓ’chΓ© bats about the same time I got the little group of witches. They are pretty fragile and I've not seen anything like them since I got them so long ago.

Haunted barn.

 

 

Here are our counter egos, Bruce, my little son, and me, Halloween style.

 

 

 

 

This witch cracks me up. If you clap your hands, shut the door too hard, or drop something, etc., she goes into a cackling frenzy and rocks back and forth. There's been a few times Mr. Bruce has stumbled out of bed at 6 in the a.m., shut the door into the kitchen, and off she goes. Probably not exactly what you want to hear before your eyes are barely peeled open. She's been the source of just a bit of under your breath muttering in this house…. πŸ˜‰

 

 

 

Even if it's a pain in the neck dragging all this stuff out, it's worth it once it's done. It helps me quit whining about summer being gone so fast, and gets me into a cozy fall mood! One (AKA me) really needs to remember to appreciate each and every day of each and every season!

TTFN,

Teresa

 

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“East Meets West”

There's a new mural in town. It's very appropriately called “East Meets West”.

The City approved using a 17' x 48' side wall of the Civic Center for the mural. The mural was painted as part of the Yellowstone Asia Initiative summer art event that took place here in July. A local artist, Parks Reece, designed the mural, then he and several other artists, some local, some from China, painted the very unique and interesting story art on the building.

The Grizzly bear represents the West/Montana/USA in the painting.

The Panda bear represents East/China.

I love how wonderfully imaginative it is! There are several different animals representing both Countries; a bald eagle, a crane, a red fox, and a giant rainbow trout in the sky.

 

You can see how the Great Wall of China morphs into the Absarokee mountain range, and the sleeping giant is at the right of the mural, under the flying crane.

I'm not sure who the little guy with the yellow hat under the arrow sign is….maybe Parks. I'll have to look a lot closer next time I'm at the civic center. There are all kinds of little hidden things in the painting! Even tho it is at the back of the building, it faces the small park and bandshell where the Farmer's market is held each week in the summer. Everyone gets a nice clear view of it from there. How lucky are we?!!

TTFN,

Teresa

 

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Family Room

I feel a blabbing spree coming on, so here goes! πŸ™‚

If I had known at high school graduation what I know now, I would have gone to college for, of course, interior design. What adult woman who blogs under the home interiors category doesn't have that secret ambition, but have most likely repressed the dream πŸ™‚ Some are brave and take action on that dream, and I say good for them! Several of the blogs I follow, the women have gained a bevy of followers, and are now offering their design advice (for money) to their followers that want it. I wouldn't dream of hanging myself out there at this stage in the game (even if I had a mega popular blog), and instead just subject my poor house (and now little cabin) to all the furies of my overactive decorating ambitions.

Rustic style decorating turns my crank! [I'm too hard headed to be a swooner πŸ˜‰ ]

Pinterest

With bits of softer, 1800's type antique cottage style thrown in for good measure – sort of rugged (or tending to lean to the more masculine-ish side), but with just a dab of softness here and there to keep it from looking too “pioneer bachelor style”.

Pinterest

Throw in a smidge of Craftsman/Mission style, and I am a happy camper! And, very importantly, always on a squeaking tight budget, so if I regret a purchase, I'm just out the few bucks I've forked over at the thrift or rummage sale. That is my aspiration. Everything is certainly a learning process, and always a work in progress. I sure know what I like when I see it, and feel comfortable in my home, but may have developed a bad case of “My Own House Blindness”.

Pinterest

After searching high and low for blogs with a rustic type of distinction, I've come up empty handed. (I have found some awesome primitive style blogs, tho, and really like them, but I'm searching for less Colonial, more Cowboy and Indian.) If you know of any out there, let me in on the secret, would ya pretty please? I've seen lots of awesome rustic-ness on Pinterest and Houzz, but none that I've seen seem to be attached to blogs.

I am infatuated with Ralph Kylloe's beautifully photographed books of cabins and log homes that span the United States, and study them like bibles. Judging by many of the higher end homes in this area of the state (real estate site cruising), rustic decorating seems to very popular. Much of the content of Mr. Kylloe's books are homes from the western half of Montana. It seems odd to me that I'm not seeing much of this style of decorating in the blogging world at all. I'm glad to see the “ethereal whiteness” starting to fade in the blogging world. I love light and bright and timeless, but some of the house tours I've seen where white is the be all end all, it looks like there should be clouds in the room, and maybe an angel or 2 playing harps. It's good to see some color creeping back in. But even that comes with it's extremes, it seems. I subscribe to several of the magazines out there now, and feel more disappointed with each issue I receive. I can't understand the hodge-podgedness of so many of the homes they feature. I realize there is the “to each his own” factor in everyone's home, but I want to open a magazine, be drawn into the rooms, and think “I would give my right arm to live in that place”.

Anyway, what the heck do I know besides the fact that my house is good enough for who it's for! I took a few more pictures in my family room today and thought I'd stick them right on here for your perusal. If you tend to sway toward rustic style, maybe you'll like 'em, but it's sure OK with me if you don't!

This is my TV table. It came to live here from Craig's List! It is solid pine and had a natural finish, and wooden knobs. I remodeled it πŸ™‚

When I decided to use it for the TV, I knew the open back would be a problem, because all the cables and wires would show. Mr. Bruce had brought back a few good sized bundles of extremely old, used wainscoting that had been salvaged from his great grandparents original old homestead house. He couldn't stand the thought of something that had survived for probably more than a hundred years, and that someone had been thoughtful enough to salvage from the old house, to just have it discarded at the dump, or thrown into a burn pile, so he toted it clear back to Montana. It is awesome. I wish there had been a truck load of it. I showed him my plan to attach the wainscoting to plywood so it could be screwed to the table for now, but the whole back can be taken off later if need be (it could be made into an awesome headboard). Once installed, it sure took care of the cables showing.

I had already painted the small armoire a few years prior to this, and wanted the table to match.

So I painted and distressed, hunted up some more red twig dogwood down by the river, sketched out a design for the twig placement, and Bruce attached them with his brad nailer. Then I added the rusty knobs that I had found at a rummage sale. All of the pictures, pottery, and books on the TV table came from rummage sales and the thrift store.

I found a few more Indian things in the Cowboy/Indian bedroom, and put them with the street sign. The block to the left is a copper and steel antique printing press block of an Indian in full headdress. It's so cool close up!

Moved my bear pic out here, took down the branding irons, and hung the rug on the wall.

The little Indian is a bank I found in New Hampshire while on vacation.

 

 

Next on the list to tackle is the freshly vacated bedroom! I was a brut and made my big little son take darn near everything he owns to his new apartment. I wanted it good and empty because that little beat up room is going to get a cottage make-over!

OK, done blabbing now.

TTFN,

Teresa

 

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A Tour of the Extremely Bargain Furnished Living Room

Felt like it was time to re-arrange. Sounds much easier than it is – my living room is difficult. Too many doorways and the big ol' Tulikivi stickin' way out into the room. Just have to use a little imagination to get everything juggled around.

It's a blustery, thunder and lightening day. Here it is, the middle of the afternoon, and I had to turn the lamps on just to see what I was doing.

I love these rocking chairs. The smaller one came from Bruce's Grandparents farm, the larger one I found at a rummage sale for $15. We reupholstered both of them and polished up the oak, and I think they turned out really nice. I took the gothic window off the sideboard in the dining room and was at a loss where to put it. I didn't want to squash it back in the closet because it's pretty and needs to be seen πŸ™‚ so I propped it up in the corner and kinda like it there for now.

Moved the leather chair over to the other corner and it makes a good reading spot. I got this chair at a rummage sale for $35, bought the leather at a saddle supply shop in Billings, and managed to find an upholsterer in Bozeman that was a total bum. He had the chair for almost 5 months until I threatened to turn him in to the Better Business Bureau, Consumer Advocates, and any other consumer help agency I could think of. He then finally finished it, and did do a decent job, but the whole experience made me really wish that I knew how to upholster my own larger pieces. Simple smaller pieces I can do; big pieces, I'm a fraidy cat to try.

The metal coffee bin to the left of the chair I got at the thrift store for $25. The roll top desk behind the chair I rescued from my sister-in-law, who had it all ready to go to the dump. The cabinet that sits atop the desk is the upper portion of a Hoosier type cabinet which came from (you guessed it) a rummage sale; a super score in my opinion for $20! I “married them” and they are terrific storage.

That opening to the entryway, above the chair, is where the gothic window was supposed to be built in. A good dozen years later, I got sick of waiting. So when we got the oak floors in the living room last fall, I told Bruce to square off the opening, trim it out, and call it good. I'd had 2 carpenters look at it, and neither of them new how to trim out a Gothic arch. Oh for the craftsmanship of yesteryear! It is so hard to find help to hire in this area, and then you're lucky if you even get the basics completed. Thank heavens I have a very talented husband. Unfortunately, his day job keeps him far away from the “honey-do” list a goodly portion of the time. But when it gets down to brass tacks, he comes thru for me and some things get finished up. And very nicely I might add πŸ™‚

The pictures above the lamp are originals. Some of the very few originals I own. I mostly have antique prints.

I got this tiny drawing of sheep from an art gallery here in town (during crazy daze) for a wonderful price. Bruce cut the mat on our cutter, and the frame was (of course) a rummage sale find. Total cost, approximately $12! Not bad for original art πŸ™‚ I cut the little picture in the lower right hand corner out of a Victoria magazine and stuck it against the glass just for good measure cuz I thought it was cute.

I bought this farm scene at an antique mall in Bozeman because it reminded me a lot of Vermont with it's church steeple sticking up in the background. Turns out that, I believe, it's Russian. The detail on the steeple and the artist's name are what make me think that. This photograph doesn't do it justice. It is beautiful and very detailed when you see it up close. I'm so glad I got it, as the antique mall where I purchased it burned to the ground just a few months later.

Some of my flock of sheepies. This little plaque is cement, and was a gift from my Mom.

More sheep, and the print is one of my very favorite – it has a stone bridge with arches just like the very one we have in our town at Sacajawea Park. I got it at a rummage sale πŸ™‚ and framed it myself.

Here is my custom made in North Carolina couch that I purchased at a rummage sale for $40 and had reupholstered (not by the bum, but by an awesome upholsterer that has since moved away πŸ™ ) The lady I bought it from said she had it custom made, pre-children, back when she and her husband both had high paying jobs and more money than they knew what to do with. It is a phenomenal sturdy, hardwood, camel back sofa, and I don't know why she didn't just have it reupholstered herself. My gain!

A portion of my collection of antique, chalk painted Indian pottery.

I put my cast iron barn and farm animals on the sideboard where I previously had the gothic window.

 

There is a small light in the barn which makes the whole barn turn into a night light in the evenings. The china cows came from Bruce's grandparents; I found all the rest of the critters here and there over the years. The barn came from a thrift store in Big Timber.

I put all the rest of my sheep collection out, too. I only put them out about once a year because I have so many different collections and like to rotate them all. So it's fun to start unwrapping them and it never fails I'm surprised by some that I had forgotten about. I'm easily entertained πŸ™‚

Anyway, just thought I'd share some of my treasures. Now, maybe you can understand why I'm so whiney about not being able to rummage due to my new job! I hate shopping retail because I can't stand paying retail prices for anything! For real, 90% of my house is furnished with rummage sale, hand-me-downs, thrift store, auctions, etc., which I'm sure has saved me bazillions of dollars over the years πŸ˜‰

TTFN,

Teresa

 

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Happy Father’s Day

This is a picture of the outside of my Dad's work shop on the farm.

I think it is so interesting to look at all the bits and pieces of tools and whatnots he has found in his travels while working around the farm.

Each and every piece, I am sure, could tell quite a tale. This has been a working farm since 1865. Montana became a State in 1889, so my folk's farm was established while Montana was still considered a territory!

In her corner of the farm, my Mom has her beautiful, colorful, artistic flower gardens that are a splendor to the eye. My Dad, on the other hand, has his own style for artistic display shown in this very interesting, historic collection for all to enjoy on the walls of his very unique shop.

TTFN,

Teresa

 

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Randomness

My itty bitty brain is just whirling – just a few weeks ago it was snowing pretty mightily around here; now it feels like full blown summer. I mean windows open, birds tweeting, grass growing inches per day summer! A few weeks ago, I was a domestic diva πŸ™‚ tending my house, chopping wood, keeping my laundry up; now I'm back to alarm clock waking, trying to figure out what would be fastest to prepare for dinner after work, and making lists so I can try to keep up with everything that needs to be done in my very condensed at-home-time. Yup, no mo fairytale, it's back to the real world.

So, in order to try and achieve a little zen, I will share some pictures of random this and thats I have captured in the spare minutes I've grabbed over the last several days.

 

 

 

I have lots of pretty little flowers popping out. I was sad to see that I did lose many plants and ornamental bushes to this vicious winter we just escaped from – what a cold mean bugger he was!

We have had a few pretty substantial downpours over the last few weeks, and the bright side to that, along with the glorious greenness that presents itself, are these wonderful gifts from nature –

Morels! Oh, they are so yummy! Just soak them in water with a few teaspoons of salt and about a teaspoon of vinegar to dislodge any buggies trying to make a morel it's home, drain 'em, make sure they are nice and clean, cut them in half lengthwise, and drop them into a frying pan with a little butter, olive oil, sea salt, smoked paprika, and a smidge of pepper. For real, they are a gourmet gift to your taste buds! My big little son went down to the river and scouted out a few, which we ate for dinner that night. The next day he went out to my folk's farm and found about a quart of them. They are shiny clean and residing in the freezer, to be carefully doled out on special occasions.

 

There were at least a dozen Western Tanangers in my yard today, flitting about, eating from the suet feeder, and having a merry time. I just love watching all the birds that come to my yard. I think this giant window we put in during the kitchen remodel was the smartest thing we've done with this house. Actually, that would probably be second to the Tulikivi.

I changed a few things around in the family room. I found a beautiful print by one of our local artists, downtown at an antique/junk store. I needed another picture like I need a hole in the head, but it was so reasonably priced I couldn't resist.

I had the frame which I'd purchased several summers ago at a yard sale, so just had to have a mat cut and was good to go. It is a Russell Chatham print. I looked thru his archives online, and I believe this one is named “March Afternoon”. I truly love his work. He has lived here for decades, and the biggest majority of his art is done of this area, primarily Paradise Valley. His lithos and oil paintings go for many thousands of dollars, so I was happy to just be able to have stumbled across a print I could afford. Any kind of affordable work of his is about as scarce as hen's teeth to find. (Sorry about the reflections on the picture – I don't know how to get around that in photography yet.)

I found the “Indian Lane” street sign at a rummage sale the week before I started work. (Don't even get me started on having missed the last 4 weeks of rummage saling – I could just cry about it!) The metal Indian head is also a rummage sale find from a summer past.

Work has begun on the cabin.

 

Yikes.

It's still chilly enough in the evenings to have to start the wood stove up.

Coming home we saw this Mama and baby. Within a half mile stretch we saw the moose, at least a dozen deer, 10 antelope (which was strange because we were still in the mountains and they usually prefer being out on the flats), and these 2 courting cranes below.

So, that's a lot of randomness for sure, and is probably just the tip of the iceberg for what the summer holds. We have a lot of irons in the fire! Guess I better stock up on Wheaties! Or spinach!

TTFN,

Teresa

 

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PYROGRAPHY

While I impatiently wait for the weather to clear, I thought I'd throw a little something at you that you probably don't read up on every day. Pyrography! A most vital subject that everyone should know a little about πŸ™‚ Apparently it was a really popular craft, way back in the day, for young ladies to learn. Kind of like embroidery samplers, sewing, crocheting, tatting, knitting, etc. It involves using a wood burning instrument and burning designs onto wooden furniture pieces, boxes, and the like.

Several times on this blog I have mentioned furniture I have inherited that was originally owned by my Great Grandmother. I'm going to jump on the genealogy bandwagon again and tell you yet another story about some pieces that came from (and, in this case, were made by) her. Her parents had 8 children, and like most pioneers the family lived hard lives. They lived in and around Virginia City, MT, and other small towns in the near vicinity. Both did a multitude of jobs to try and make ends meet and keep their children fed. At one time, the family kept 40 (FORTY!) boarders at their place. This was when gold mining was booming in the area. When the children were smaller, my Great Great Grandfather employed a Chinese man to help my Great Great Grandmother cook for all these folks they boarded, and also an American Indian woman everyone called Indian Mattie to help with the massive amounts of laundry that had to be kept up (this was pre-wash machine days; tub and wash board, heat the water on a fire times). As the children got older, they were put to work helping either their mother or father with many different tasks. By the time my Great Grandmother was 13 years old, she did a large share of the cooking for their many boarders. Learning at that young age turned her into a phenomenal cook for the rest of her life. Most girls of that day (around the turn of the century) only attended school until about the 8th grade. I don't know how my GtGtGrandparents achieved it, and my 96 1/3 year old Grandmother can't remember all the details of the story, but somehow they were able to send my GtGrndmthr to a boarding school for girls. Actually, she attended 2 schools, St. Peter's Catholic School in Anaconda, and St. Vincent's Academy in Helena. Pyrography was one of the skills she learned.

They probably started with smaller projects like this box she did. But look at the detail!

Even on the sides, every bit was covered in detail. That would have taken a lot of concentration for a seventh or eighth grade child to achieve.

As their skill level progressed, so did the size of their projects.

 

 

I think this level of detail is amazing, especially when you think she was only twelve-ish.

This table was also one of her projects; I'm not sure what caused the blackened area damage, but it is old, and I'm sure has been thru a lot over the years.

 

 

Apparently, not only girls learned the skill. This small table was done by my Great Uncle when he was a boy.

He was an Uncle by marriage (married to my Grandmother's sister), so we're not too sure about his childhood history, where he would have learned this craft.

 

And this small piece of art I found at an antique/junk store in Big Timber. I can't control myself when it comes to anything to do with antique sheep art of any kind. I have a lot of prints and paintings of sheep, lots of Putz, ceramic, and china sheep. Which reminds me, it's about time to put the sheep collection into the decorating rotation! I like to see lambies at Easter time……sure says springtime to me.

 

 

I would like to know the story behind this little plaque. I wonder if some astute little student worked long and hard on this project at her (or his) boarding school far away from her parents, if she was a native Montanan like my GtGrandmother, just what the long story must be before it got to my home. That's why I cherish antiques; whether they are from my family and I know their story, or it's a piece I've found and it's story is a mystery, I think they deserve a safe haven and place of honor because they've made it thru all the bumps and dings time dishes out.

TTFN

Teresa

 

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