Corners In My House

 

Living room

 

Living room

 

Family room

 

Living room

 

Cottage bedroom

 

Family room

 

Entry way

 

Upstairs bathroom

 

Kitchen

 

Master bedroom

 

Master bedroom

 

Kitchen

 

Laundry/Utility room

 

Laundry/Utility room

 

Cowboy/Indian bedroom

 

Cowboy/Indian bedroom

 

Family room

 

Living room

 

Dining room

 

Family room

Just a few pics of random corners throughout my house. Guess I better make myself useful and start dusting some of them…. πŸ˜‰

TTFN,

Teresa

 

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A Bright Spot in a Dreary Winter

This has been the craziest winter. The weather has been so cold and stormy, it seems like one day just blends into the next. Where usually that makes things feel like they are dragging, this year it is zipping by. I kind of feel like I'm sleep walking thru this season!

Anyway, one of the oldest projects on the honey-do list at my house has finally been completed, so thought I'd share! We remodeled the family room and kitchen about a year after we moved in here. That was a long time ago! For all the years since we finished, there has been no hearth mantle around the wood stove in our family room. I've begged, whined, and belly-ached for so long! I even shopped around trying to find something ready-made that I could slap up there on my own, but had no luck finding anything that would fit in the space. I do know how to use power tools, and I did take wood shop in high school, but I'm not brave enough to tackle a project that is a really prominent, and permanent fixture in the house. Something like that needs to not be done by an amateur, but by someone who is a craftsman. Bruce is more than capable of building a mantle, but it's that darn time thing again, and there just aren't enough hours in the day to get everything he needs to do done. So, I told Mr. Bruce I was going to start searching for a carpenter to get the dang thing built and installed! As it turns out, we were lucky enough to have the perfect fellow agree to do the project. Mr. Z was a shop teacher when I was in high school. When school was out during the summers, he and a few other teachers would do carpentry projects, even house building. When Bruce moved here from Nebraska, he was fortunately hired by Mr. Z to be on their summer crew! They became great friends. Bruce worked for him off and on over many years, until finishing college and finally giving up carpentering for full time engineering.

Mr. Z is an extremely talented wood worker, but has all but given up the craft because he struggles with severe rheumatoid arthritis now. But Bruce pleaded, and thankfully Mr. Z consented! I would have settled for a simple 3 board, faux beam looking mantle just to have the project done, and not have that ugly, unfinished space showing anymore! But he came over to measure, and see what all it would entail, and he asked me what I would truly like to see up there. I showed him a quick sketch of the super simple 3 board method. He said “Now, if I'm going to take the time to do this, I want you to have what you really want!” Well, with a green light like that, I proceeded to pour my heart out! I told him how much I like arts&crafts/mission style, showed him a few pictures in some of my American Bungalow magazines, then drug out my stash ……

Several years ago I took an Adult Education pottery class our local high school was offering; 5 weeks, one evening per week. My Mom, my “other mother” Roxy, and myself, all signed up and were excited to go. Unfortunately, we had a “teacher” that was not interested in teaching. She said she was turning us loose to do whatever we felt was creative, and she would mentor us if we felt it was needed. :-/ Maybe some of the others in the class were familiar with pottery, but the 3 of us had never worked with clay before! So, we did the best we could with what we had – It wasn't too difficult for my Mom or Roxy because they are both extremely artistic, but I'm another story! Back to my good old American Bungalow for reference, and I managed to churn out 10 tiles, and several long faux branch tiles for a border. Our “teacher” did not take good care when she fired our clay works, and we ended up with all manner of round bottom rather than flat tiles, and other deformities on Mom and Roxy's projects. But it cost $100 to take that class, and I hoped I would someday be able to use my finished products, given that terrific cost.

So I pulled out my box of tiles, and worked with Mr. Z on incorporating them into the design. I chose 6 tiles to use, not wanting to overwhelm the woodworking, and he left with a plan.

A few weeks later, he came back with a beautiful, artfully done mantle; solid oak, stained a rich golden brown, and in the mission style that I love so much. He and Bruce carefully installed it. I could have jumped with joy! It was my job to place the tiles in the spaces he had designed to hold them. I knew it was going to be a bit of a challenge since they were round bottomed and out of square from the firing mishap, and I was terrified of messing up that phenomenal mantle. I got some epoxy glue, and a tube of grout and went to town! I'm very happy with the finished product because of the wonderful woodworking, and it is such a relief to finally have it done! It's also nice to have a little offering from me built into the house, because this house sure owns a big chunk of my heart!

 

 

 

 

 

Now I just need to re-black the stove pipe, add a fresh coat of satin sealer to both the rocks and slate hearth, and it will all be fresh and finished! Makes me so happy when something can be checked off the mighty to-do list!

TTFN,

Teresa. πŸ™‚

 

 

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Warm Stone and Birch Bark

This very minute as I write this post, it is -19.1 degrees outside. In my book, that's chilly. But here I sit, snug as a bug in a rug, cuz I have a secret weapon… and it's a good one.

 

It's our Tulikivi soapstone stove. They are awesome. They are expensive. They are totally worth it. Especially when you live in a climate that consists of about 7/12 of the time immersed in very coolish to downright frigid temperatures.

 

When we had our addition added to the house, the plan was to have a gas fireplace installed. Not particularly what I wanted, but, as with all our projects, there was that ever present, nagging budget hanging over our heads. I wanted this new space to be a bit more formal than the other living spaces in our home, and Bruce wanted carpet, so with all that being said, I knew a wood stove was not a good option; carpet and wood stoves are a bad combo. So I ordered and paid for carpet during a big sale in October, with the understanding that they not install it til the following April, to which they agreed. My folks were doing some work on their place at the same time and replaced their wood burning stove with a gas stove. They got to be the guinea pigs. Unfortunately for them, the gas stove salesman told them what turned out to be fib after fib. All of the promises of extremely low fuel use to warm their home, little to no maintenance ever to be needed on the stove, and generally overall extreme efficiency – all those promises turned out, in my Mom and Dad's case, to be false. They encountered problem after problem right from the start. Well, phooey on that! A gas fireplace or stove was out of the picture for our addition after seeing all the headaches my folks were going thru.

 

Several years prior to any of this, I had read an article about soapstone stoves in Country Living magazine. After that, owning one had been a dream of mine, but I figured the odds of getting one were about as good as me capturing a unicorn. A very funny twist to this story is that about a year before we started the addition, it just so happened that the Tulikivi headquarters for something like the Montana, Wyoming, parts of Idaho and Colorado region (not exactly sure how much area their particular region covers) opened right here in our little town. All I had to do was mosey downtown to talk to the distributor, rather than call someone up to 500 or so miles away and try to figure out, long distance, if getting a Tulikivi would even be an option for us. 'Twas meant to be! And it is truly an asset to our home. I would recommend ownership to anyone. It was a pinch (more like a punch) to come up with the funds for it, but we had penciled it out as closely as possible and figured the stove would pretty much pay for itself at about the 8 year mark. And it has. It works like this; soapstone is a soft stone that easily absorbs heat. The whole stove is constructed of stone (from Finland!) and has an intricate flue system. You stoke your stove, open the air vent wide, and get a massively hot fire burning in the box. The fire passes thru the flue system and all the while the soapstone is heating up. The stove only needs to be loaded up 2 or 3 times, depending on how cold the weather is. After the last burn, the stone is toasty warm and provides radiant heat for around 24 hours (which keeps your house furnace from kicking on because the room temp is ^). Shut the vent down and you are good to go!

 

There have been a few hitches – the carpet was bought and paid for, so there was no turning back on that (ugh – carpet and wood stoves), and, had we known before I designed the addition, the placement of the stove is not what I would have chosen. But the room was already built when the plan changed from gas fireplace to Tulikivi, so we did the best we could with what we had. It makes it a little difficult to arrange furniture because that stove comes out into the room 5 feet including the hearth. But that's a small price to pay in exchange for all the goodness we get from the beast! And, of course, I whined for at least 6 of the 12 years we had carpet, about getting wood floors. Bruce finally caved, and we had oak floors (oak flooring that I found on Craigslist for 1/2 the price of retail) installed last fall, and they turned out beautifully. In the pictures above, you can see the area rug I found. On Craigslist. All wool. Vintage. Perfect condition. Amazingly, the exact colors I needed for the room which was crazy happenstance as the walls were already freshly painted when I found it on CL. 12 feet by 9 feet. $250 smackers. BONUS! We saved enough on the rug that I broached the subject of adding some kind of stove backer to the wall just for aesthetics. I always felt it looked nekked and plain with just a painted wall behind the stove. I got the hairbrained idea that I wanted to nail a row of quaking aspen saplings to a piece of plywood and mount it to the wall. We couldn't find a source for wood that small, so I started researching birch or aspen bark. Found a supplier, and voila! Bruce and I installed the whole works, and Ima likin it a lot! I wallpapered the entryway in birch tree paper that I had been coveting for 3 years and the whole thing is perfectly tied together in my opinion. I'll throw in the next picture so you can see a snippet of the wallpaper.

Here's a close up of the real birch bark behind the stove, complete with moss!

 

We used birch tree branches to trim out the sides to cover the plywood edges. I advertised in the wanted section of Craigslist for anyone that had trimmed birch or quakie branches, and a kind person responded and we picked up all their yard litter cut offs πŸ™‚ .

So now you have the lowdown on how great Tulikivi stoves are, how birch bark panels look as a hearth backer, and a reminder of how wonderful Craigslist is! Oh, and also, how totally much better it is to have pretty oak floors rather than carpet when your house is heated with wood!

TTFN

Teresa

 

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Cozy Christmastime

Yay! Christmas! HAPPY BIRTHDAY JESUS!!

 

So happy to have all the decorations up. Now to just get in gear and start baking and candy making.

So, here's the nickel tour of the front of my house (living and dining rooms). I don't put too much in the back (kitchen and family room) because too many critters, too many not so careful fellas. I don't want to be ruining any teeny amount of Christmas spirit that might be germinating by being a nagger, so I just keep fragiles out of harms way by parking them in the parlor.

I had a terrible aversion to putting together my tall tree this year, so decided on using 2 little ones instead – one for the living room, one for the family room.

A small portion of my Santa collection on top of my Great Grandmother's nearly 100 year old piano.

My Mom is so very talented and has made many sweet, story telling little Santa (and other characters) vignettes for me. She makes their faces and hands from Fimo dough, builds a body for them with wire, stuffing, and cloth, then sews their beautiful suits. The Santa above is decorating a tree with the help of a magpie, sheep, Corgi, Scotty, and kitty, all of which she crafted herself.

The older Santas are really special to me.

The night before Christmas book was my Mom's when she was little. It has pop ups and beautiful pictures in it. It is taped and tattered and has been very well loved by my Mom, my brother, myself, and my son over the many years it has been in our family.

The little Santa, in the sleigh, didn't have any hair under his hood. That just didn't sit well with me, so I talked Rooti into volunteering one of his curly locks. After snipping it off, I tucked it around Santa's face with tweezers and I feel much better now that he has a proper hair-do.

The Woodland Santa above was a gift from Mr. Bruce after I had given him a terrific tongue lashing about him not appreciating how very fortunate & lucky we are to be able to celebrate Christmas. No bah-humbugging allowed I told him. It apparently peeled away the Scrooge in him long enough to see his way to giving me this lovely present. He really gives it all he's got now to keep up the holiday cheer, because we must remember the reason for the season, thank The Lord, and count our blessings each and every day.

A little grouping of my non-red Santas.

 

This Santa is a candy container; his legs come off and he is hollow inside.

 

This little Santa was my Great Grandmother's. It is just over 100 years old as close as we can figure.

 

This Santa on the goat is another one of my very favorites.

 

The baby angel below, riding the swan, is another of my Mom's creations. She found a ceramic Cupid kind of ornament, carefully broke the face off of it (ooh, sounds violent :-0, don't make the girl mad at ya!) made a body & found some teeny golden wings, and voila! A swan riding, baby angel! She made the swan out of wire, stuffing, cardboard, and a coat hanger. No pattern, no lessons, just her own God given talent. I added some of my other swans including the swans I talked about in a prior post about our vacation to New Hampshire & Vermont.

I found this very strange ?wine glass? At a rummage sale this past summer. It is over 16 inches tall and I believe is true crystal ( it makes that humming sound that crystal does when you run a damp finger around the rim of the drinking part). I thought it would make a unique cloche/snow globe type decoration for some small Christmas cuteness. I paid the full dollar asking price, then stored it in the Christmas room fingers crossed that it would still be in one piece when the holidays arrived.

The swirls etched on the glass make it seem like a little fairy tale winter snow storm around the mini cabin and tiny deer.

Santa and his team on the rooftop, and an old hymnal inviting one to belt out a few carols :)

A polar bear parade.

A pretty, old gothic shaped church window decked out in holiday finery.

This little house just makes me want to shrink down, and mosey in for a cup of hot chocolate by the fire.

Another one of my Mom's whimsical Santas. He has the dearest face. The greyhound dog in front of the fire was brought back from an antique store in Scotland. He was a birthday present from my Mom's friend Roxanne (my udder Mudder I call her). The fireplace was a gift from my friend/co-worker Cheri. I had seen it at an antique mall, didn't buy it, then proceeded to whine about it at work. Somehow Cheri got over the mountain pass before Christmas and bought it for me, bless her heart.

These deer were a gift to my son from my Mom's cousin. They belonged to her father, and probably were purchased in the late 1930's she thought.

This little goat was made by my Mom. She bought the sleigh, but built the harness for him. By chance and good luck I found the tray (in the background) at a rummage sale. I showed the tray to my Mom, and that Christmas, a jolly little elf mysteriously appeared in the goat sleigh one day!
There is a story worth telling about the little stove in this picture. My son went to my folk's farm when he was little instead of daycare. He was quite the farmhand, helping with all the daily chores from the time he could walk (and in a backpack before that!) The Christmas he was 4, he declared that, for Christmas, he was asking Santa for a wood stove. The kind like Grampa had in his shop. OMG, instant panic on my part!! Where in the dickens was I going to find such a thing? My folks thought it all quite funny. The story was relayed to my uber talented brother, who very nonchalantly replied that he could make a little stove for my son, no problemo. The beautiful little result sat shining under the tree that Christmas morning. Talk about a Christmas miracle!! Thank you Lord for such a talented, artistic family!! My brother said you could actually use the stove if a person would want to pipe and vent such a tiny thing to the outside!
Santa and the Scotty on his lap – more from the good Mom. My Dad made the willow chair and foot stool Santa sits in. His lap throw and shawl crocheted by Mom. The big black metal dog is from my collection.

A backpack basket full of sparkly holiday greenery, with a dove nestled in the middle.

This crew resides in the bathroom for the holiday season.

Also made by Mom. I call this my Nova Scotia Santa w/ baby.

She made this baby from a tiny china doll found buried under a bunch of miscellaneous junk at an old shop.

All the shells she used in making the tree came from our vacation in Hawaii, and Roxy's vacation to Florida.

Well, this is a pretty good sampling of Christmas at CottageLodge. There is a good deal more, but I can't have you missing your own Christmas spending days looking at my bazillion decorations! Glad you stopped in for a look, and hope it added to your holiday cheer!

MERRY CHRISTMAS EVERYONE! AND A BLESSED NEW YEAR!

TTFN πŸ™‚

Teresa

 

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Relaxing at the CottageLodge

 

Sittin by the fire, taking it easy tonight. I'll be running my stairs a-plenty tomorrow. Packing up the pumpkins and turkeys, tucking them in the storage room, then dragging out my 1,220 totes (maybe not quite that many, but feels like it when you're lugging them around) of Christmas stuff and transporting them all upstairs. Better eat my Wheaties for breakfast; better yet, a black coffee IV might be a wiser choice!

 

TTFN

Teresa πŸ™‚

 

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