BRING ON THE RUMMAGE SALES!

There is some serious rummage sale withdrawal going on in this county. For whatever reason we don't have flea markets or vintage sales much at all in this whole state as far as I can tell. When I read other blogs (based in other states) it seems like a lot of the folks have been going to big, wonderful fleas and sales for several weeks now.

Maybe, around here, this has something to do with it…

 

 

 

Boy, we've gotten our fair share of the white stuff this winter (and spring). It's funny, tho, that when someone has a sale because they are moving, or for whatever reason, bad weather or time of year doesn't seem to deter folks from attending in the least. It's each man for himself, and if you have the forethought to wear protective sport padding under your coat, smart. You are much more likely to get thru the throngs of people unscathed, that show up at these early-in-the-year selling events πŸ™‚ It's all elbows and attitude once they fling the doors open.

We attended an estate sale about a month ago and were lucky enough to score a nearly new microwave for $5! for the cabin, and a few other odds and ends. But, Oh, the people!! It started on a Friday, and I think many must have taken a vacation day from work just to attend! Last weekend 2 sales were advertised in our local paper. I was so excited! Then I started to fret about the people factor. Gosh, I just hate the “Black Friday” type madness that occurs when there is only 1 or 2 sales. But they both sounded really good, so I decided to put on my big girl pants and just get after it. Sure glad I did! I ended up grabbing about 10 things, and left with nary a black eye.

Here is more show & tell of a few things I've picked up for the cabin over the last month or so. Some are thrift store finds along with the rummage sale stuff I just got.

 

Somebody worked hard carving this Indian Brave from balsa wood. He is so light, I nearly threw him to the ceiling when I found him are the thrift.

 

 

I love old Yellowstone Park collectibles, and hunt for them all the time.

 

I was in heaven!! But I could have laid on the floor and kicked my feet when I got to the check out line and saw what other people were leaving with…..so much neat stuff!! They said 'no earlies' in the ad, and sure enough they let people in early :-/ grumble,grumble But no matter, cuz it seems I've developed this disorder, where (in my mind) the cabin seems to grow considerably between my visits there. Unfortunately, my bubble is burst when I walk thru the door after having been away for a few weeks, and there it is in all it's itty bitty cuteness. Nowhere close to the expanse I have imagined in the interim; where truckloads of furniture, galleries of pictures, and scads of antiques were supposed to have room to live! I'm a pretty good squisher-inner tho, so I'll stack, and arrange, dangle, wedge, and squeeze at that little cabin; and what doesn't fit there can come back and live at CottageLodge πŸ™‚

Here's another cute thing for the cabin that came from the downtown thrift.

Nobody else in the whole, wide world will have another lamp like this one! It is a one-of-a-kind, authentic, beaver chewed log base, with a cow hide shade I added (which also came from the thrift earlier this year).

And a neat old frame (out of the free bin). I've had the cute little beaver for ages and thought that would be a good clue to sit by the lamp.

Over the last few years I've gotten a pretty good bear collection started, and if space allows, some of them can go up, too.

 

 

So, even tho I've got ants in my pants to get to work on the cabin, there is still plenty to keep me busy right where I'm at. There's a vegetable garden to plan, lot's of yard work to be done, and the perpetual honey-do list on the house. All good!! All fun!! So blessed!!

TTFN,

Teresa

 

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PYROGRAPHY

While I impatiently wait for the weather to clear, I thought I'd throw a little something at you that you probably don't read up on every day. Pyrography! A most vital subject that everyone should know a little about πŸ™‚ Apparently it was a really popular craft, way back in the day, for young ladies to learn. Kind of like embroidery samplers, sewing, crocheting, tatting, knitting, etc. It involves using a wood burning instrument and burning designs onto wooden furniture pieces, boxes, and the like.

Several times on this blog I have mentioned furniture I have inherited that was originally owned by my Great Grandmother. I'm going to jump on the genealogy bandwagon again and tell you yet another story about some pieces that came from (and, in this case, were made by) her. Her parents had 8 children, and like most pioneers the family lived hard lives. They lived in and around Virginia City, MT, and other small towns in the near vicinity. Both did a multitude of jobs to try and make ends meet and keep their children fed. At one time, the family kept 40 (FORTY!) boarders at their place. This was when gold mining was booming in the area. When the children were smaller, my Great Great Grandfather employed a Chinese man to help my Great Great Grandmother cook for all these folks they boarded, and also an American Indian woman everyone called Indian Mattie to help with the massive amounts of laundry that had to be kept up (this was pre-wash machine days; tub and wash board, heat the water on a fire times). As the children got older, they were put to work helping either their mother or father with many different tasks. By the time my Great Grandmother was 13 years old, she did a large share of the cooking for their many boarders. Learning at that young age turned her into a phenomenal cook for the rest of her life. Most girls of that day (around the turn of the century) only attended school until about the 8th grade. I don't know how my GtGtGrandparents achieved it, and my 96 1/3 year old Grandmother can't remember all the details of the story, but somehow they were able to send my GtGrndmthr to a boarding school for girls. Actually, she attended 2 schools, St. Peter's Catholic School in Anaconda, and St. Vincent's Academy in Helena. Pyrography was one of the skills she learned.

They probably started with smaller projects like this box she did. But look at the detail!

Even on the sides, every bit was covered in detail. That would have taken a lot of concentration for a seventh or eighth grade child to achieve.

As their skill level progressed, so did the size of their projects.

 

 

I think this level of detail is amazing, especially when you think she was only twelve-ish.

This table was also one of her projects; I'm not sure what caused the blackened area damage, but it is old, and I'm sure has been thru a lot over the years.

 

 

Apparently, not only girls learned the skill. This small table was done by my Great Uncle when he was a boy.

He was an Uncle by marriage (married to my Grandmother's sister), so we're not too sure about his childhood history, where he would have learned this craft.

 

And this small piece of art I found at an antique/junk store in Big Timber. I can't control myself when it comes to anything to do with antique sheep art of any kind. I have a lot of prints and paintings of sheep, lots of Putz, ceramic, and china sheep. Which reminds me, it's about time to put the sheep collection into the decorating rotation! I like to see lambies at Easter time……sure says springtime to me.

 

 

I would like to know the story behind this little plaque. I wonder if some astute little student worked long and hard on this project at her (or his) boarding school far away from her parents, if she was a native Montanan like my GtGrandmother, just what the long story must be before it got to my home. That's why I cherish antiques; whether they are from my family and I know their story, or it's a piece I've found and it's story is a mystery, I think they deserve a safe haven and place of honor because they've made it thru all the bumps and dings time dishes out.

TTFN

Teresa

 

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GOT SNOW?

It did warm up as promised last week. Even at the cabin. But we have tough snow in these parts apparently. Not much of a dent was made in the drifts and piles up the mountain, despite the 40 to 50 degree temps. Bruce decided to venture up to the Moosey Springs Retreat Center for the weekend, regardless of the to-his-chin snow. He brought his small rummage sale find camera. I'm glad he did; this was pretty impressive.

The garage has less of a pitch on the roof. It really piles on there.

Digging out the privy was first priority.

He dug out enough to get a swing space for the door. Then he had to jump off the drift down into the shoveled hole. He had to use snow shoes (the good ones I got at the thrift!) just to get around outside when he wasn't on the snow machine.

Get a load of how much (or little) of that metal gate is showing.

This is at the end of the covered part of the porch. Get out the shovel!

 

This bay window is broken and was tarped up when we bought the cabin. With all the snow now, we can see that this is most likely what broke the glass in the first place, probably last winter. It was put in by the last owner several years ago, and extends out beyond the overhang of the roof, which caused a lot of water invasion problems having no roof protection from the snow and rain. The snow pressing in also broke a window on the porch just since our last time up, so now it has a blue tarp cover also.

Bruce told me he fixed dinner, played some solitaire, listened to the radio and read a bit, then hit the hay. At 12:30 in the a.m. he was jolted out of bed by a noise, the likes of which he had never heard before. He grabbed a flashlight, jumped into his boots, and ran out to the porch. A great big chunk of the snow had slid off the roof with a crash.

 

By the following afternoon, most of it had come off. There is a wood burning cook stove on the enclosed porch, and where that chimney comes out of the roof, the weight of the snow sliding off bent the stovepipe like a straw.

 

Oh my goodness there is a long list of fixes to tackle this spring to get this little abode back on it's feet! It is most certainly usable right now, but is also at a point where if we don't jump on the disrepair it has befallen, we will be in a peck of trouble a few years down the line. Hmmm……kind of reminds me of a house we bought awhile back πŸ™‚ Thankfully the cabin is less than a quarter the size of our house, so fingers crossed it won't take forever and a day to get it put in good order. Fingers crossed really hard….

 

TTFN,

Teresa

 

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Yup, Still Winter

It was a below zero weekend, but lovely nonetheless.

A big bunch of cedar waxwings came to my yard and helped themselves to the freeze-dried Japanese flowering crab apples that are still clinging to the branches.

These pretty little birds were a mere 4 feet away from my back door, and very graciously ignored me while I took their pictures.

 

I love the soft little trilling sounds the make when they come to feed.

 

 

The wind wasn't blowing (which is very unusual around here), so minus a couple of degrees was pretty tolerable. You tend to get used to having to deal with a windchill factor that will have you growing icicles off your beard….Bruce was testament to that this week while out shoveling the sidewalks! He had an icicle long enough dangling from his mustache that he tried to make it in the house to show me, but it fell off at the door and shattered πŸ™‚

We decided to try and shake off some cabin fever, and hopped in the truck for a short drive around town.

We have a lot of deer right in town. They are not terribly afraid of people and this doe was not bothered at all by me taking her picture.

There are 2 in the pictures; can you see the second one?

On the outskirts of town there is a trail where we walk the dogs when the weather is a bit more cooperative. You cross a little bridge over this creek and it feels like you are miles away from any town. There were several ducks there when we took our drive. Had I known we would be seeing them, I would have brought some bread for them. Even tho they are wild, they will let you feed them, and when it's this cold, a little nourishment goes a long way for these critters.

Anyhow, it is supposed to be in the forties starting Tuesday, and last the entire 10 day extended forecast per Weather Underground. We'll see…… πŸ™‚

TTFN

Teresa

 

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HAPPY BIRTHDAY GLEE!!!

Yesterday was my little sweetie's birthday! Of course we had to have a party.

 

Rooti was kinda tired, so we let him snooze and he ate his cookie later.

 

Asia and Angel were following Rooti's lead.

They were dreaming of sleeping in their favorite basket on the porch, with warm breezes, and birds tweeting in the trees.

So I made some puppy cookies, with tasty, healthy ingredients, for the birthday girl (and everybody else after nap time).

Then we went outside for a short walk but didn't get too far…..too icy!

So we did a few chores instead while we were outside.

Have to earn my keep πŸ™‚

With all the lovely weather we've been having, the wood pile is shrinking fast :-/

Back to the house to warm up, and get a birthday cookie now that they've cooled off.

Did somebody say cookie?

TTFN πŸ™‚

Teresa

 

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