Moose On The Loose

We've been zipping back and forth to the cabin so often the last several weeks, it has given us a greater opportunity to see an abundance of the wildlife living in our area. I have seen some of the most beautiful birds, but when you are rolling down the highway, it is tough to get pulled over in time to catch a photo of them. There is, of course, no shortage of deer. I think they are so pretty, but they are dumb as rocks when it comes to the highway; I drive in fear of one jumping out. There have been quite a few antelope around. We even have half a dozen or so that hang about in the pasture at the end of our street here in town.

Last weekend we were ever so lucky to come across what was probably a family of moose. This is photo overkill, but they posed so nicely a just kept on clicking.

This cow was moseying about, grazing, but you can see she was a bit annoyed.

This young bull was about 150 feet behind the cow, and was doing his best to romance her, but she was having none of it.

 

She just tended to her business, but kept her ears back most of the time. He was not to be dissuaded. He just kept sneaking on up. I'm sure he eventually got a comeuppance.

 

Her this year's calf kept popping in and out of the brush, but kept his/her distance. I wasn't quick enough to get a photo of the baby. If we hadn't been in such a rush to get up to the cabin, I could have spent a good hour there watching them.

 

A bit further down the road, we came upon this young fellow.

He stood so nice and still for me. I was thrilled, but really wish all of these moose had been a bit more skittish, because I hate like the dickens to see them hunted. They are so much more rare than the hundreds upon hundreds of deer here, and even the elk are much more plentiful.

 

I wouldn't be a bit surprised if he is last year's baby of the cow we saw.

 

When I was coming down from the cabin a few weeks ago, a huge bull burst out of the trees and ran along side the truck til I slowed down to grab the camera. He then cut in front of me, then dropped down and ran toward the creek.

It all happened so fast, this is the only clear pic I was able to get of him, and he was already far and away. He was amazing – nearly black, with a massive rack that I would bet was nearly 6 feet wide. As he ran along side the truck, he was close enough I could see his eye, the shininess of his coat, and that huge rack. I was mightily impressed and feel that was a once in a lifetime blessing.

Dang, I love this beautiful state I live in! Not for 1 second do I take it for granted.

TTFN,

Teresa

 

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We Made It!!

So the big day finally arrived! The massive equipment had no trouble navigating the twisty mountain road, thank goodness.

 

 

This is Leroy, the crane operator's dog. He really gave wild Miss Piper a run for her money! He was twice her size and they ran laps! Then stuff started moving along fairly quickly, so everyone was rounded up and we (Declan, Piper, and I) stayed in the truck and out of everyone's way.

It was down to serious business now.

All braced, sturdied, and strapped up. It was a very interesting, but stress inducing process. After seeing the miserable lack of craftsmanship while demo-ing, we (but especially Bruce) were so afraid that the cabin might not hold together when lifted.

And here we go – about 4 feet up at this point.

Amazingly, so gentle, and smooth. No swaying, or jerking. No cracking, popping, creaking, or groaning. It was so graceful….and quiet!

 

 

 

 

 

And down. A total of 6 minutes aloft. Believe me, it felt like 60 minutes while it was dangling in mid-air!

 

Safe and sound, Thank you Lord!

 

 

 

 

What a relief!

I climbed up the ladder to take a look inside.

 

What a difference. Because it is tucked more in the trees now, the light inside feels completely different. It is up so much higher it feels very tree-house-ish!

Then we took a look at the mess that was left behind.

 

 

 

It is plain to see how badly the north side is sunk down. And even with no building to hold it in, the smell was still horrific while standing on the abandoned floor. This whole mess will be broken up with a backhoe, and hauled in a dump truck to the dump.

Since it was a weekday, there were only about 4 neighborhood folks there to watch the move. They all gave a good round of applause when “the eagle had landed” πŸ™‚ . Bruce came over to talk to everyone, and I jokingly told him “Now the work really begins!” and boy, those folks didn't miss a beat and said “Give the poor guy a break!”. I really was just kidding! I am so proud of all he has done to get this huge project accomplished, and almost completely singlehandedly. It was no small feat, and clearly shows how dedicated he is to this little mountain house.

There are several more projects in the works over the next few weeks……running new electrical to the cabin; having closed cell insulation blown onto the underside of the floor; securing the cabin to the new flooring system; cleaning up all the mess left behind; cutting in and installing a new back door so the wood stove can be moved back in (just so we will be able to use the cabin this winter – it would be near impossible without the stove), and too many smaller things to list. Now we are in a race with the weather. You never know what to expect in Montana, and I thank the Lord the weather held to move the cabin. Big equipment can't make it up the road if it's wet or snowy. So, cross fingers it will be a lovely, long, mild Indian Summer, and we will be able to get everything buttoned up before winter.

TTFN,

Teresa

 

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The Last Rush

Well, Mr. Bruce is, again, fighting with Apple. So, instead of showing you the wonderful little video of the cabin move, you get plain old pictures – dagnabbit. I'll give you a few pics of the low down in getting ready for the move. A few posts back I showed you the floor system on the pier foundation that Bruce finished up without a ton of time to spare. Just soon enough that we had a couple of weekends to basically gut the inside, cut the body of the cabin away from the foundation, and get all the electrical capped off and a temporary source placed outside the cabin. Here are a few pics of the process –

The kitchen in pieces.

 

The bathroom and bedroom walls gone.

 

 

The floor, oh the floor. It slopes, rolls, dips, and bucks so badly, the only way they could lay tile on it was to cut the 12 x 12's into pieces in order to get them down the hills and dales. I was not sorry to see that wretched mess left behind.

There was a lot of water damage on the bathroom floor.

The wood underlayment in the bathroom was just rotted, and slivered off at the slightest rub. The whole floor bounced mightily when you walked on it. Probably lucky no one fell thru.

Here it is with each and every mess of a wall gone. It was insane how badly it was all cobbled together.

 

 

 

From the time we got the cabin, there was always a yucky, musty smell inside. You'd get used to it after a bit, but as soon as we'd get home, that horrible smell was so obvious on clothing, jackets, even your hair. It just reeked when we pulled the cabinetry out of the kitchen and bathroom. I'm sure it was from all the water damage that had occurred over the years.

Take a look at this bay window's damage, caused from snow and water, and from being improperly installed. And the logs beyond, from those decks holding snow up against them for so many winters.

 

 

 

All of the windows are garbage and will be replaced next Spring; and we plan to have the logs sand blasted (with ground walnut shell) then we will stain and reseal the logs inside and out. Resealing should eliminate any lingering gross odors.

Here is the sum total of all our ripping and tearing –

One giant pile to take to the dump

One giant pile to burn

We salvaged all we could, but there wasn't much worth saving.

We slept in Bruce's little camper trailer, and it was cozy and nice. We were all so exhausted (including the 2 vole hunters) we slept like rocks.

The iPad is out of juice, and it's near midnight and I have to work tomorrow, so I will plug this obnoxious little machine in to charge up, and be back tomorrow to finish up this chapter of our continuing saga!

TTFN,

Teresa

 

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It’s Gonna Be Worth It!

 

The countdown has started – only a few more days until the big crane comes up the mountain to pick up our cabin and move it to it's new resting place on the pier foundation and new floor system that Bruce built. So I will share a few pics of some of the steps leading up to this gigantic, nerve wracking occasion.

To the left of the cabin are the cement piers that Bruce built last fall. This summer he worked building the new floor system. My big little son has a full time job in the town where he goes to college, but he came down 2 or 3 times on his days off to help his poor, tired Dad. We are also very fortunate to have a wonderful neighbor in our cabin community who generously jumped in of his own free will and worked like a horse helping Bruce out. We will now address this wonderful neighbor as “Saint John”! πŸ™‚

 

 

The massive beams, all framed up and attached to the piers. Next step was attaching the decking, shown below, when finished

The cabin will be quite a bit further off the ground when on the new foundation. My big little son is over 6 feet tall, so this gives you an idea how far up the floor will be, with him standing next to it.

The porch floor will be where his elbow is. No new decks will be built after the move. The previous decks were responsible for a large part of the problems this poor cabin has suffered, because they held the massive amounts of snow up and against the logs and windows all winter, winter after winter. The weight of the snow broke the glass in several of the windows, and that is why you see blue tarps on them.

Just before the rest of the decks were torn off.

Bruce tore the deck off (where the wagon is sitting) several weeks ago to assess the damage to the base logs.

It's a rough looking mess, to say the least.

Here is an intermission shot of a vole hanging out of Declan's mouth. Super gross!! Bruce takes them away from her and throws them far and away. This last weekend she caught one and was so proud of herself; Bruce went over to take it away and she ran. He had to crawl on his hands and knees under the new foundation after her. She thought it was a game I guess, and kept backing up with her tail wagging the whole time. When Bruce finally got up to her, she looked him straight in the eye and took one big GULP! Oh my gosh, I could have barfed right there on the spot! It was not an extra small vole, and she just swallowed the thing whole :~[

Now, onto the inside. These next few pics are after we had moved most everything to storage, but hadn't started ripping yet.

The room below originally was a 2nd bedroom. The last owner tore the wall out to make it part of the living area. We kept a bookshelf and a small kitchen table and chairs there.

 

The tiny, tiny bathroom. Shower in the left corner, cabinet and short hot water heater facing the shower.

 

Potty and sink, and there is a strange, angled corner medicine cabinet above and to the right of the sink. Notice the 2×4 holding up the front of the sink. O brother! We really hope to be able to make this room a bit larger. It is so tiny you can barely turn around in there.

Looking in at the bedroom (which is to the right of the bathroom). It is only 9' x 9'.

Looking out of the bedroom, out to the wood stove, which is beyond the ladder to the loft.

The kitchen, just before we started ripping. The only things I was able to salvage were the cabinet doors, and the stainless steel sink. Everything else was so cobbled together it all fell to pieces or had to be smashed, in order to get it out. I am not a waster, and would have saved anything possible, but it was a lost cause.

The cupboards were put in over this green shag carpet, then they tiled right up to the cabinets.

The more we uncover, the happier we are we are moving forward with this huge project. There are so many things that are literally life threatening for anyone staying there, as it stands. The electrical is a complete terror – Bruce said it is pure luck this cabin didn't burn down it's so bad. He had to crawl into the space under the cabin and was appalled at what he found. They had filled 5 gallon oil cans with cement and used them as part of what was holding the whole cabin up!! He found live wires dangling, with no caps, coming from crazy junction boxes. Who builds something like that??!! Someone just wanting to make a fast buck, I guess. And, to think, it has stood nearly 45 years that way – good grief! As soon as he saw what a mess the electrical was, he got an electrician up there and they installed a temporary set up until the cabin gets moved.

 

 

The whole cabin is completely empty now, just a box. He has to finish cutting around the base of the cabin with a sawzall to free it from the existing floor and foundation (if you can call it that!). Then, bracing timbers must be placed inside the cabin to keep it sturdy, and keep it from wracking when they strap it up and crane it over to the new foundation.

Hopefully, this will all definitely be the right thing to do. They don't make anymore land, and we are sure lucky to have a little piece of some of the good Lord's finest work! A cozy little cabin in the mountains is the stuff dreams are made of, at least in my book!

Cross fingers that all goes well!!

 

 

 

 

TTFN,

Teresa

 

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A Crazy Ride

Here are a few photos of a nice afternoon ride we took around the cabin on the 4 wheeler this summer. The Crazy Mountains are a beautiful place to be. This was a sort of last hurrah knowing that the work on the cabin was going to get very real, very shortly. So we dedicated the whole weekend to goofing off.

 

 

A lot of the mountain wild flowers were starting to peek out. It was cool, and beautiful, and the flies were not tormenting us.

 

 

 

We caught this gal taking a nap not far off the trail.

I was sorry we had disturbed her, but she didn't seem to be too bothered by Us.

I had taken Declan on short rides on the scooter and 4 wheeler, but this ride was a couple of hours, and she loved every minute! Since we've gotten Piper, she has gone on a few not quite as long jaunts, and is also quite the mountain girl. I just tuck one under each arm, ride on the back while Bruce drives, and off we go!

We came across this old abandoned cabin, which was quite large. I wonder if it was a family homestead back in the day, which many people often left for “proper houses” closer to town eventually. I wouldn't think someone would go to the trouble of building a weekend cabin just to let it fall to such ruin.

Since there were so many flowers coming out, there was an abundance of butterflies nectar hunting. I was able to catch a few shots of this one.

 

 

A lot of the old pine trees at higher elevations were covered with this moss. They looked a little spooky.

 

There are some pretty spectacular views to be had in the Crazies. I cannot tell you how blessed we feel to have a little piece of this paradise.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Such a wonderful day!

Now back to reality, and the labor of love that lies in front of us! YIKES! A humongous labor of love!

TTFN,

Teresa πŸ™‚

 

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A Happy Birthday For Me

I have been at my “new” job for a year already, so decided it was time to take a bit of vacation. My birthday was last week and I thought that would be an opportune time. Bruce said he would swap his holiday time off from Monday (Memorial Day) and take Friday instead, and we could go to Billings. Then I could peruse all the antique shops to pick my own birthday present. He is a smart fella. He knew that if he could come up with something lots of fun that I couldn't say no to, chances were greatly reduced that I would ask for my usual gift of labor on his part! (Instead of asking for wrapable gifts, I always ask him to finish some project on the honey-do list.)

So I had a wonderful, leisurely week. Got some gardening done (despite lots of rain), and managed to do a little pre-Billings birthday shopping right here in town. I found this first book at the fancy-pants thrift downtown.

I love books, and was thrilled when I opened this one and saw all it had to offer.

Chapter after chapter of animals found in the wild, with each chapter culminating in a frameable print, if a person would be so inclined to cut it out of the book. All of the pictures are by the artist Francis Lee Jaques who did innumerous illustrations for the magazine Outdoor Life. In addition to the beautiful pictures, the whole book is a very interesting read. It was published in the mid 1950's.

 

This picture alone was reason enough for me to buy the book. I think it is beautiful, and would go wonderfully with my small collection of other fox pictures – that is, if I can bring myself to cut this book. My Mom raised my brother and I to respect and never disfigure or maim books. But I can see, in my minds eye, a lot of these illustrations beautifully matted and framed, hanging at the cabin!

 

 

Especially this one! With the cabin being named Moose Springs and all πŸ™‚

This second book I found at the regular thrift, and spent a whopping 75 cents for it! It is by Lawrence Sheehan whose wife Carol was the editor for the the magazine “Country Home” for many years. Her wonderful editorials were the first thing I turned to when I subscribed to that magazine, before it went under. She was like reading a favorite blog; so personable, fun, and interesting. Apparently she was a contributor to this book, and it is grand.

It has endearing photography, touching stories, and great ideas for incorporating dog inspired collections into your home.

 

 

 

I can't understand why anyone would have wanted to be rid of this book and donate it to the thrift! Oh well, their loss is my gain! It couldn't have come to a better home – I read my decorating books over and over again!

And on to our Billings trip –

This was my first find. I love how when something is just right, it practically jumps right off the shelf or wall into your arms. You can pass a thousand other things, and then, all of a sudden, there is that one something special thing that just pops out and glows! At least that's how it seems to work for me. The photo doesn't do this collector plate justice. It is a really stunning portrait of an elk, and will look perfect at the cabin.

For my turkey collection. I do not have another hen turkey looking back like this one, and at $4 for the pair I couldn't pass them up.

Another purchase for the cabin, and not only to feed my lamp fixation, but also my bear collection.

I think he is a cute little guy, and was very reasonably priced at an antique mall.

This Navajo style, 100% wool rug was a steal of a deal at a saddle shop. Now I wish I would have gotten 2, but I need to hold back a bit to see what will be truly needed when I get to finally decorate the cabin for real.

 

I was tickled to find these 2; Yellowstone Park memorabilia is getting harder and harder to find.

When we got home, my Mom and Dad came to town for cake and ice cream, and brought me some more awesome presents!

Isn't this the cutest little winter cabin! I love it!

And, what a coincidence, another plate! But this one is a true antique, and so beautiful and unique! It's funny because for Christmas my other Mother, Roxy, gave me an antique picture of a turkey herder that she found in Round Top, Texas; then my Mom finds this plate with a turkey herder! I have old pictures with sheep herders in them, but had never before heard of or seen turkey herders!

My Mom also gave me some yummy smelling lotion and lip balm, and 3 cute shirts for work. Talk about getting spoiled!

Then my bestest neighbor/friend/critter-sitter Eileen brought over this sweet garden light and hanger.

It is so pretty, and really puts out a lot of light, so I put it next to the steps in my yard to help folks not trip in the dark. She also brought me a personal birthday cupcake, and a baby tomato plant for my garden that she started from seed at her house! AND, she babysat Glee and Declan while we were in Billings since that was the first time Declan has been left for a whole day.

Pretty darn awesome birthday, wouldn't you agree?!

TTFN,

Teresa

 

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FLOWERS, SALAD, and BUGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The flowers are trying to do their best in this very unpredictable spring weather we are having. It spit snow and rain all day today. The honey bees are out and about trying to work, but it's so chilly they are like they are in slow motion. I even left the dandelions growing in the flower beds because I read an article that said the bees can utilize the dandelion blooms, and I try to do all I can to help them.

My Mom stopped by and said “You had better get after those dandelions, or they will take over all your flower beds and your lawn.” I told her what I had read, and she reassured me that I have enough flowers popping out to get the bees by without keeping the dandelions. So out they came, and they were by far the healthiest crop in the flower beds!

My Great Grandmother used to make salad with the dandelion greens, but I haven't been ambitious enough to try it. She also used to make watercress salad that everyone raved about. I finally got to go to the cabin last weekend (it had been 6 months since my last trip up), and I found lots of fresh spring watercress in several places up there when we took the dogs for a walk. I really want to try it, and I'm sure my Gramma probably still has my Great Grandmother's recipe, so maybe I will give it a shot. I remember the trickiest part about getting it ready was getting all the little water critters out of it before eating it. She would soak it all day in her kitchen sink in cold water with a whole bunch of lemon juice added, and that would bring the bugs to the top. GROSS. Call me squeamish, but I would just as soon not eat bugs as my protein for the day! A couple of summers ago I was at my cousin's, and we were picking raspberries in her yard and eating them. I tossed a big juicy one in my mouth and it felt like I got a shock! I spit in my hand, and there stood a big ol' ant, looking me right in the eye! The bugger had apparently been a hitch hiker on the berry and bitten my tongue! No thanks, I'll pass on the bugs.

Well, this turned into quite the random little story. My intent was to just show you all a few pretty posies. I believe I inherited a blabbering gene from somewhere in my very mish-mashed lineage πŸ™‚ .

TTFN,

Teresa

 

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PROGRESS

Here are a few shots of the progress on the new foundation for the cabin.

These are the drilled holes, but pre-pour of the cement piers. There was a good deal of surveying, angle calculation, time, and effort just to get these dozen holes put in the ground. And the majority of this Bruce did all by himself. God bless his heart.

 

 

 

He had to frame everything up, and set the sonotubes and rebar cages (which he wired together himself). Nine of the twelve holes drilled that will hold the pier posts ended up taking on water from the underground springs on the property. That did not make Mr. Bruce happy at all. He had to rent a pump and make other modifications to make sure everything was ready for the concrete pour. It took him the better part of the week to have everything ready. He had the concrete delivery scheduled for 9 a.m. on Saturday. Then, here came the cement truck, approximately 2 and 1/2 hours late. Just enough time for the ground in the yard to thaw out and be good and soft. I had to work the day they poured, and I am glad I wasn't there to watch, because it was a very stressful, torturous day. The cement truck got stuck on the property because of the boggy ground and excess weight of the loaded truck. And it was stuck a goodly distance from where the cement needed to be poured. A very good hearted man, who just happened to be stopped and chatting with Bruce in passing, gave up his Saturday on the spur of the moment when he saw the terrible picture unfold with the truck, and knew what a horrible pinch Bruce was in. He helped him get that concrete from the truck to the foundation holes, which was no small feat. Another cabin neighbor had a bobcat (a small tractor like piece of equipment) he let them use, and they would fill the bucket then drive from the truck over to the holes and dump in the concrete a scoop at a time. Not good. Once the cement was unloaded from the truck, which was a long while later, they were able to get it unstuck, and the truck driver got out of the yard and back to the road. This is a very condensed version of what transpired. There were lots of other exciting things that happened in the process, but this would turn into a book if I elaborated.

I haven't been up since the pour. Bruce said the road in the yard to the cabin is a torn up mess, and the piers are not pretty by a long shot, but thank The Lord they are done. And he beat the snow to boot. Needless to say, he decided to skip going up there this weekend. He needed a break away from that turmoil for a bit. Now, we wait til next Spring, then starts the process of getting everything ready to lift the cabin from the present foundation and move it over about 35 feet to the new foundation. Oy Vey, I don't even want to think about that…too scary.

So, on a happier note, here are some pictures I took on the way up to give Bruce moral support during the earlier part of this ordeal. I was a worthless helper, but that stuff was way beyond my capabilities.

This was one of my travel partners. The princess Declan, in her little pink blankey.

Glee rode in the back seat so she could hang her nose out the window. This little gal just snoozed the whole way up.

There was an impressive storm rolling in as I drove up.

It rained a little, slushed a little, and patches of blue sky shone thru all the while. Made for a very pretty spectacle.

It was pretty nice for the few hours I was up at the cabin. Bruce said I left just in the knick of time as it rained cats and dogs shortly after I headed back to town.

The trees in the cabin yard were putting on a pretty show of colors. Most of the leaves in town have blown off already. The wind just doesn't stop in this little town.

Anyway, steady by jerks. We just need to keep the faith that all will go well with this little mountain house, and it will be so wonderful when everything is completed and sturdy and snug when we finish.

TTFN,

Teresa

 

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The Drive Home From the Cabin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What a beautiful day. If you click on the photos it will make them a bit bigger. I wish I could capture and pass on to you what it really feels like while driving thru the midst of this breathtaking scenery; the light and shadows, and hugeness of it all. The vastness and splendor is nearly indescribable. It just makes my heart swell to near bursting. Thank you, Lord, I am so fortunate to live here.

TTFN,

Teresa

 

 

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One Thing Down, A Thousand More To Go

 

August is fire season in Montana. This year is no exception. We've gotten smoke here even from fires as far away as Canada, and more recently, the Missoula area, which is about 230 miles from here. Everything takes on an orangish hue, it gets very hazy, and distant views are very limited. Sometimes it smells very smoky out, at other times you barely notice. Montana is plagued with a pine bore beetle infestation. That makes for lots of standing dead pine trees in our forests, which is certainly fire fodder. That's why I was so happy the forest service came in last winter to the area where our cabin is, and did some clearing to hopefully reduce fire risk.

There was a huge standing dead pine, and a few smaller ones, on our property at the cabin.

Definitely not an asset. Too much big wind, lightning, heavy snow, etc., around here, and it needed to come down – with help, not on it's own, as it could possibly squash our little outhouse, or worse, if left to it's own devices, fall to where the cabin will be placed on it's new location (that'd be great, wouldn't it, to just get the cabin moved over, then have a huge tree fall on the roof?) Time to get gone, tree.

This tree was particularly bad as the top branched out in 3 different directions, which makes them even more dangerous. A pine tree with a single trunk and a split, multi branched out top is called a “school marm” by loggers. It also already had a bad crack down the side of the trunk, which considerably weakens the stability.

Bruce knows a fellow who formerly logged for a living, and asked him if he could come knock it down since he had the experience. He said he'd be happy to, and would enjoy it since he doesn't often have the opportunity to do that since he's changed professions. Very lucky for us. It took him no more than a few minutes, and he had that giant dead tree laying on the ground in just the right direction.

 

 

 

 

 

Bruce earlier took down the few other smaller trees himself, but this huge one was just too dangerous and really needed someone with the proper expertise to take it down. (Thanks Brian!!)

We had gotten a firewood permit last month from the forest service, and my big little son and I had made one trip up and gotten about a cord plus that we loaded up and brought to the cabin. That is only about a third of what probably will be needed for the winter up there. We knew we'd have to make at least a few more forays out amongst the giant, man eating horse flies (they are horrible up there this time of year, and bite like the dickens) to get a couple more cords, but now with these dead trees felled right here on our own property, there should be more than plenty to last the winter and spring.

Lucky Bruce now gets to cut all the logs to length with the beautiful, new chain saw I asked for for my birthday last year! One of the best, most useful presents I've ever gotten, and comes complete with a fella to run it πŸ™‚ .

There was a full moon when we stayed this last weekend.

We had a campfire and roasted marshmallows, and watched the big, bright moon rise over the mountains. Doesn't get much better than that.

The next morning, this doe was standing right outside the kitchen window as I made coffee.

You can see the wild raspberry bushes growing in front of and under the deck. Glee loves raspberries, so we picked all the ripe ones we could find and she ate them for a snack.

So, at least one more thing checked off the massive to-do list at Moose Springs. Gotta love that!

TTFN,

Teresa πŸ™‚

 

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